HIRING OVERSEAS WORKERS – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

In Payroll & Employment by Clyde Mooney

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Samantha Mondon is director of A.I.M Professional Business Support Services. She spoke with PubTIC about the current employment climate – in particular, the ups and downs of overseas workers.

 

We know how important it is to maintain the smooth running of your business – and – we understand when an overly keen backpacker or student walks through your door wanting to earn some extra cash, you jump at the chance to employ them.

However, there are a few things you need to know before you decide to fill this void with people holding temporary visas.

Under the Migration Act 2013 employers are now responsible for ensuring their employees hold the appropriate work status. This is due to a high number of people working illegally in Australia on temporary visas. Penalties can be up to $76,500 per worker.

To avoid problems, simply follow these steps:

  • Undertake a Visa Entitlement Verification Online (VEVO) check
  • Create a contractual obligation for another party to verify work permissions
  • Create a contractual obligation for another party to supply persons with the required permission to work in Australia
  • Inspect their passport
  • Inspect an Australian Certificate of Citizenship or Certificate of Evidence of Resident Status or Certificate of Status for New Zealand Citizens in Australia, accompanied by a form of ID featuring a photo of the worker
  • Inspect an Australian birth certificate, accompanied by a form of ID featuring a photo of the worker

It is recommended you perform these checks prior to the worker commencing employment. For employees on bridging visas, conduct a three-month VEVO check, with all other visas to have a six-month check conducted.

This is incredibly important, as after they commence employment you could discover:

  • The worker’s visa will soon expire
  • The worker’s visa application has been refused, jeopardising their ‘bridging visa’ status and right to work in Australia
  • The worker has been approved for a visa application but it has restricted working conditions or no working rights
  • The worker may have had their visa cancelled and as a result, resulting in a breach of its conditions

We provide a free checklist to ensure employers are not breaching their responsibilities. For this or further immigrant worker information, visit www.aimresume.com.au or email info@aimresume.com.au

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